Training

How To Detect Fake News With These Tools and Techniques

Through links to studies and reports as well as applications, journalism educators share several concrete tools readers can use to detect fake news. 
A critical thinking model is provided to show how using cognitive skills to think through content, analyze and make a decision as to what constitutes a fake story is the best method of detecting fake news.

Transcription: There’s an app for that

Technology has made it easier than ever for reporters to connect with their sources, whether they’re across the street or halfway around the world. With so many digital recording options, it takes no more than a few clicks and swipes to record an interview with a source. The biggest problem reporters face when it comes to digital interviews, however, is how to deal with all the recorded content once the interview is over. Turning those audio files into useable text isn’t always easy. Transcription is a time-consuming and often costly part of the job.

Appointing federal judges and U.S. attorneys: An explainer with resources

While the presidential appointment process for a Supreme Court seat draws national attention, few take notice of federal judge appointments. There are hundreds of federal judges and these appointments, too, are for life. Because the judges wield significant power, they are at the core of a president’s legacy. 
Federal courts have jurisdiction over a wide variety of crimes and civil disputes outlined in the Constitution and other federal statutes, including election fraud, weapons trafficking and terrorism.

7 ingredients for effective reviews

Powerful reviews do more than offer a list of observations about a movie, TV show or play. Reviews, like all forms of opinion writing, work best when they tell a story and connect with their audience. Eric Deggans, the TV critic for NPR, shares these strategies.

Read the tips here.

How to remember who vs. whom

“Who” is a subject. “Whom” is an object. But in our fast-paced world, there often is not enough time to figure out whether something is a subject or an object, especially if you forgot how to do that. 
We often advocate a sort of test, where you flip the sentence around to determine whether you would use “he” or “him” in its place. If you would use “he,” it’s “who”; if “him,” then “whom.” Sexist though it is, it often works.

How not to ‘adjectify’

Remember that by definition, an adjective is a modifier. So any time you want to use one, ask yourself why you need to modify the noun. 
If you want to use an adjective, think what its opposite might be. Would you use it then? That can help you decide whether you really need it, or whether that modification can go elsewhere, perhaps where its relevance is clearer.
We’ve often talked about labels; some adjectives act as labels, effectively pointing to the noun as “different.”

10 tools to tackle common problems journalists face

Columbia Journalism Review asked journalists what new tools and technology they use to help them do their jobs. Social media editors, curators, and reporters chimed in to tell us about tools that help them face some familiar challenges.

Links to the applications are included, alopng with with brief descriptions and recommendations.

To read the story, click here.

 

Webinar: Communicating and Collaborating Across Generations

With the country’s changing demographics – the workplace is different than five, 10 and 15 years ago. 
Learning objectives for the day:
- Understanding the different generations
- Old School, Baby Boomers, Gen X, Millenniums or Gen Y
- Techniques on creating a more productive workplace
- How to communicate effectively with each generation
- Techniques on what motivates each generation

6 ways to spread facts

The simple but frustrating truth is that facts alone are not enough to convince people. Even the most thorough, accurate piece of reporting might still be trumped by a poorly reasoned and false counterargument. Therefore, it's crucial to understand how to publish persuasive factual journalism.

Poynter's coffee break course, 6 ways to spread facts, offers tips for using facts to persuade.

Check out the link here.